The Disney Dish Thread

It feels like a lifetime ago!

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Honestly, I would be ok with the restriction staying of this was the case. Noon is doable. 2 is like half the day already. I don’t always hop, but sometimes when we do, it’s to do a few things at one park, morning things and then spend most of the day at another.

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none of this… I like none of this :face_with_diagonal_mouth:

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I just want to be able to eat lunch in Epcot no matter what park I start at! :grin:

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Epcot is the park I had in mind for hoping too! I feel like it’s the easiest park to do lunch and afternoons in but can feel like a waste in the mornings, to me at least.

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Are you saying you would prefer no APRs at all (me too)? Or that if there are APRs you would want it to actually limit attendance? (Thus making it harder to schedule close to your trip or to change plans last minute.) I bet it doesn’t have a huge impact on actual attendance.

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I would prefer no APR’s- so the APR situation bothers me. I was really hoping that would be a crowd control thing during Covid restrictions. If I am forced to make APR’s I want the max capacity to stay limited. I want some benefit to having to lock in a park in advance. If parks are allowed to be Christmas level capacity all the time, do away with APRs. They would only benefit Disney at that point. And I want something in return for the hassle. If Disney increased park crowd capacity, as in opening everything back up in the parks to disburse the crowds… well then, I may have a different feeling on the matter. But not until then.

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Fair enough. I guess what I had in mind was if APRs don’t have a real limit on attendance attached, the APR system would still be a way to say, “Hey, Disney – I’m coming to X Park on X days, please have enough staffing available!” But if you showed up day of and forgot to make an APR, you’d still be let in because there would always be capacity left. Or you could change your park while you’re still at the gate (or CMs could just let you in without an APR – i.e., no enforcement).

I don’t think the capacity restrictions impact that much, except at the very margins. Crowd levels are what they are. People who are determined to go will make their plans well in advance. Disney is always releasing more capacity as dates near, so even people who make last minute trips are able to scrounge up something if they keep checking. The only people who get locked out are APs, and it sounds like they want to keep the reservation system for APs (the way that the old Disneyland Deluxe AP worked). So it’s a false benefit to guests.

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And just to make this point clear, I’m just saying they would set the park capacity to actual capacity, not to an imagined % of capacity. Setting the cap at 100% does not mean you’d reach 100% any more often. It just means there would always be capacity except on the 1-2 very most busy days of the year.

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If they did this, no one would make APRs.

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Most people still would, especially if it’s a part of the system you are guided through when you buy your tickets. And if you had to make an APR in order to be able to make LL reservations (the way the system is currently configured). The people who wouldn’t make APRs are people who had to change plans and go a different day than they originally booked.

Correct

No they wouldn’t.

It’s not a part of the system you’re guided through NOW. And 99% of the time when you buy tickets (or a package) you haven’t nailed down your plans, so making it work that way will turn everyone off self included

I have to harp on some of my clients to make these reservations under the required status They aren’t going to do it if it’s not required (and I wouldn’t chase them)

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I thought they changed this? Maybe it was only for 1-day tickets.

I don’t know, maybe people wouldn’t make APRs, but they’d still have some idea of crowd patterns, because the % of people who make APRs would stay in a predictable band.

Yes just for that.

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This is true, it’s just for 1-day tickets because you’re buying the ticket for a specific park, so it’s automatically making the reservation for you.

But one of the main points of PRs isn’t just to predict staffing, it’s to distribute people more evenly across the 4 parks, so not having caps wouldn’t serve that purpose.

For me, they need to go. I much prefer the old form of park reservations - FP+.

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I totally agree doing away with it would be best. My point is if they insist on keeping them, increasing the caps would solve the biggest headaches about them (i.e., hard to get one last minute, stress about having to get one way in advance, being able to change plans day of, etc.).

Well, if Len and Jim are right, they’ll be gone real soon.

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So, no real point to APR then. Unless it helps Disney in some way on the planning side with CMs but then, I still see the data pointless if you do not limit capacity.

I’m thinking this is all about staffing and consumable management.

I hope they will eventually off a no black out AP. Even if it’s more expensive then the before, no APR required. I wouldn’t purchase it but I feel it should be offered.

This fluctuates with staffing availability. The APRs benefited Disney in they could control this. I don’t think Disney has the staffing capacity YET to allow actual historic capacity levels. And when they do, what was wrong with how things were before, without them. APRs are a hinderence on guests. I don’t thing APRs and true, historic park capacity (like max capacity) should coexist.

This is how it was normally without APRs…

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Only is you could make them in advance and they were set in stone, same with ADRs. Now THAT I can see making an APR for.

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Yes, I think the Disney machine hates 1 day ticket buyers, lol.

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